melancolieuse:

Granville - Le Slow

Je ne veux pas danser un slow avec toi
Oh non non je ne peux vraiment pas 
Danser danser un slow avec toi oh non

(via violentwavesofemotion)

nevver:

Start over, Kemi Mai nevver:

Start over, Kemi Mai nevver:

Start over, Kemi Mai nevver:

Start over, Kemi Mai

elenamorelli:

{ if you still believe i’m thinking of you, you’re dreaming }
-yes, you’re dreaming-
ilivetowrite-theredviolinist:

Screensavers from Paradise ilivetowrite-theredviolinist:

Screensavers from Paradise ilivetowrite-theredviolinist:

Screensavers from Paradise ilivetowrite-theredviolinist:

Screensavers from Paradise ilivetowrite-theredviolinist:

Screensavers from Paradise ilivetowrite-theredviolinist:

Screensavers from Paradise ilivetowrite-theredviolinist:

Screensavers from Paradise ilivetowrite-theredviolinist:

Screensavers from Paradise
archiemcphee:

If you’re looking for an awesome new hobby, we’d like to suggest the breathtaking sport of of Parahawking. Combining the thrill of paragliding with the majesty of falconry, birds of prey are trained to fly with paragliders and even guide them to thermal columns - which are instinctively sought out by birds to help them stay aloft and conserve energy.
The sport was developed in 2001 by British falconer Scott Mason in Pokhara, Nepal, a location beloved by paragliders for its bowl-shaped valley and by birders because it’s home to many raptor species.

If you fly with Scott Mason, vultures wing directly alongside, leading the way to the best air currents—and, if you’re game, eating treats straight from your hands. The idea to combine paragliding and hawking (dubbed “parahawking”) was sparked when Mason was watching paragliders look to the flight paths of native vultures, hawks and kites to extend their aerial experiences. Birds instinctively seek updrafts, called thermals, to stay aloft and conserve energy while flying; these same thermals push paragliders higher, making the joyride last much, much longer. To Mason, the strategy is simple: “Our vultures lead the way. We follow.”

Mason is based in Pokhara where he trains and flies with birds of prey for The Parahawking Project. Parahawking only uses rescued birds, never birds taken from the wild. It began Kevin and Bob, two rescued Egyptian vultures unable to be released back into the wild. Mason trained them to fly alongside paragliders by using treats as an incentive. A portion of the proceeds from each Parahawking ride is donated to vulture conservation projects in Nepal.
Visit Cool Hunting to learn more about the thrilling sport of Parahawking.

"vultures wing directly alongside, leading the way to the best air currents"Animals with jobs! The kindred bond between man and beast! This is just too cool! It fascinates me that there is this thing that vultures are naturally just better at, and instead of trying to replace or ignore them, this guy has gone ‘yeah cool, let’s help each other out, you’re totally better at finding sweet air currents than I am’. archiemcphee:

If you’re looking for an awesome new hobby, we’d like to suggest the breathtaking sport of of Parahawking. Combining the thrill of paragliding with the majesty of falconry, birds of prey are trained to fly with paragliders and even guide them to thermal columns - which are instinctively sought out by birds to help them stay aloft and conserve energy.
The sport was developed in 2001 by British falconer Scott Mason in Pokhara, Nepal, a location beloved by paragliders for its bowl-shaped valley and by birders because it’s home to many raptor species.

If you fly with Scott Mason, vultures wing directly alongside, leading the way to the best air currents—and, if you’re game, eating treats straight from your hands. The idea to combine paragliding and hawking (dubbed “parahawking”) was sparked when Mason was watching paragliders look to the flight paths of native vultures, hawks and kites to extend their aerial experiences. Birds instinctively seek updrafts, called thermals, to stay aloft and conserve energy while flying; these same thermals push paragliders higher, making the joyride last much, much longer. To Mason, the strategy is simple: “Our vultures lead the way. We follow.”

Mason is based in Pokhara where he trains and flies with birds of prey for The Parahawking Project. Parahawking only uses rescued birds, never birds taken from the wild. It began Kevin and Bob, two rescued Egyptian vultures unable to be released back into the wild. Mason trained them to fly alongside paragliders by using treats as an incentive. A portion of the proceeds from each Parahawking ride is donated to vulture conservation projects in Nepal.
Visit Cool Hunting to learn more about the thrilling sport of Parahawking.

"vultures wing directly alongside, leading the way to the best air currents"Animals with jobs! The kindred bond between man and beast! This is just too cool! It fascinates me that there is this thing that vultures are naturally just better at, and instead of trying to replace or ignore them, this guy has gone ‘yeah cool, let’s help each other out, you’re totally better at finding sweet air currents than I am’. archiemcphee:

If you’re looking for an awesome new hobby, we’d like to suggest the breathtaking sport of of Parahawking. Combining the thrill of paragliding with the majesty of falconry, birds of prey are trained to fly with paragliders and even guide them to thermal columns - which are instinctively sought out by birds to help them stay aloft and conserve energy.
The sport was developed in 2001 by British falconer Scott Mason in Pokhara, Nepal, a location beloved by paragliders for its bowl-shaped valley and by birders because it’s home to many raptor species.

If you fly with Scott Mason, vultures wing directly alongside, leading the way to the best air currents—and, if you’re game, eating treats straight from your hands. The idea to combine paragliding and hawking (dubbed “parahawking”) was sparked when Mason was watching paragliders look to the flight paths of native vultures, hawks and kites to extend their aerial experiences. Birds instinctively seek updrafts, called thermals, to stay aloft and conserve energy while flying; these same thermals push paragliders higher, making the joyride last much, much longer. To Mason, the strategy is simple: “Our vultures lead the way. We follow.”

Mason is based in Pokhara where he trains and flies with birds of prey for The Parahawking Project. Parahawking only uses rescued birds, never birds taken from the wild. It began Kevin and Bob, two rescued Egyptian vultures unable to be released back into the wild. Mason trained them to fly alongside paragliders by using treats as an incentive. A portion of the proceeds from each Parahawking ride is donated to vulture conservation projects in Nepal.
Visit Cool Hunting to learn more about the thrilling sport of Parahawking.

"vultures wing directly alongside, leading the way to the best air currents"Animals with jobs! The kindred bond between man and beast! This is just too cool! It fascinates me that there is this thing that vultures are naturally just better at, and instead of trying to replace or ignore them, this guy has gone ‘yeah cool, let’s help each other out, you’re totally better at finding sweet air currents than I am’.

archiemcphee:

If you’re looking for an awesome new hobby, we’d like to suggest the breathtaking sport of of Parahawking. Combining the thrill of paragliding with the majesty of falconry, birds of prey are trained to fly with paragliders and even guide them to thermal columns - which are instinctively sought out by birds to help them stay aloft and conserve energy.

The sport was developed in 2001 by British falconer Scott Mason in Pokhara, Nepal, a location beloved by paragliders for its bowl-shaped valley and by birders because it’s home to many raptor species.

If you fly with Scott Mason, vultures wing directly alongside, leading the way to the best air currents—and, if you’re game, eating treats straight from your hands. The idea to combine paragliding and hawking (dubbed “parahawking”) was sparked when Mason was watching paragliders look to the flight paths of native vultures, hawks and kites to extend their aerial experiences. Birds instinctively seek updrafts, called thermals, to stay aloft and conserve energy while flying; these same thermals push paragliders higher, making the joyride last much, much longer. To Mason, the strategy is simple: “Our vultures lead the way. We follow.”

Mason is based in Pokhara where he trains and flies with birds of prey for The Parahawking Project. Parahawking only uses rescued birds, never birds taken from the wild. It began Kevin and Bob, two rescued Egyptian vultures unable to be released back into the wild. Mason trained them to fly alongside paragliders by using treats as an incentive. A portion of the proceeds from each Parahawking ride is donated to vulture conservation projects in Nepal.

Visit Cool Hunting to learn more about the thrilling sport of Parahawking.

"vultures wing directly alongside, leading the way to the best air currents"

Animals with jobs! The kindred bond between man and beast! This is just too cool! It fascinates me that there is this thing that vultures are naturally just better at, and instead of trying to replace or ignore them, this guy has gone ‘yeah cool, let’s help each other out, you’re totally better at finding sweet air currents than I am’.

vulturesanctuary:

Parahawking in Nepal with an Egyptian Vulture vulturesanctuary:

Parahawking in Nepal with an Egyptian Vulture vulturesanctuary:

Parahawking in Nepal with an Egyptian Vulture vulturesanctuary:

Parahawking in Nepal with an Egyptian Vulture vulturesanctuary:

Parahawking in Nepal with an Egyptian Vulture vulturesanctuary:

Parahawking in Nepal with an Egyptian Vulture
delta-breezes:

Offbeat & Inspired


Looking forward to having room for a long table delta-breezes:

Offbeat & Inspired


Looking forward to having room for a long table delta-breezes:

Offbeat & Inspired


Looking forward to having room for a long table delta-breezes:

Offbeat & Inspired


Looking forward to having room for a long table delta-breezes:

Offbeat & Inspired


Looking forward to having room for a long table

delta-breezes:

Offbeat & Inspired

Looking forward to having room for a long table

(via midnightshivers)

misotrashy:

knitmeapony:

ONE TWEET. THIS FIT IN ONE TWEET. IF YOU FUCK IT UP YOU HAVE NO EXCUSE.

So much of this. 

An apology is NOT “I’m sorry BUT here’s why I’m totally in the right and think I did nothing wrong.”

Oh man I wrote a whole thing about Fair Fighting and Apologising a while ago and this is so simple but it’s amazing how many people don’t get it. 

(via cakeblr)

with-grace-and-guts:

Helen Levi by Nicole Franzen Photography on Flickr.

Yes yes yesss I’m so excited to get behind the wheel again. This’ll be me next month :D

(via death-by-elocution)

mysticplaces:


Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.
It was impossible.
"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus
photography by Guy Tal mysticplaces:


Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.
It was impossible.
"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus
photography by Guy Tal mysticplaces:


Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.
It was impossible.
"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus
photography by Guy Tal mysticplaces:


Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.
It was impossible.
"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus
photography by Guy Tal

mysticplaces:

Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.

It was impossible.

"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus

photography by Guy Tal